Small Mental Shifts Make Self-Care Possible for Social Workers

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Response to Self-Care Article

Thank you very much for this article. I am an MSW student and often think about self-care as something I can only do when the rest of my school work is done. I also perceived it as an action or an event that had to take place. I have told clients before to use thoughts as self-care, but never practiced that myself.
After reading this article, I think of self-care as a constant process that takes place before, during and after my work. This could include your concept of reframing. One of my negative thoughts is that I won't have enough time to finish my tasks. This thought often distracts me and stops me from actually doing the work. One way I could reframe that thought is to think that I can make time to do all my work, I can cut back on social media time for example, and invest it in school work. In reality, I do have the time to do my work, and it has to be managed better. Using this strategy not only will help me feel better emotionally and have a plan, but it will also save me time in order to finish my tasks on time.

Isabella Karabed more than 1 year ago

Self Care Article in the Social Work MagazineI

The article on self care as a social worker was enpowering and has motivated me to utilize self care, not only while servicing clients, but to utilize this technique on a daily basis. Wonderful information, I have obtained, while reviewing the Social Work magazine. I am a social worker with my Master's Degree in Social Work. I am excited, I found this magazine, while browsing on facebook.

Gloria E. Castro more than 1 year ago

Thank you

I am glad you found us through our Facebook page! We have several articles on self-care and published a self-care book this year called The A-to-Z Self-Care Handbook for Social Workers and Other Helping Professionals. more than 1 year ago

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