Real World Clinical Social Work Blog: Saying No to Gratitude and Forgiveness

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Grateful for your voice

As one that works with survivors of trauma, often inflicted by family, I appreciate your nuanced and comprehensive perspective that the themes with the best of intentions may often hide to the worst of agendas.

Amanda 31 days ago

Totally agree!

I wrote on essay on this too. Thank you for this!http://www.lynnjames.net/Lynn_James_Counseling/Lynns_Writings_files/Forgiveness_An_Act_of_Defiance_Sept2014.pdf
and about those cliche's that people toss out during difficult times...http://www.lynnjames.net/Lynn_James_Counseling/Lynns_Writings_files/Spirituality%20and%20Suffering_Mar2015.pdf

Lynn James more than 1 year ago

Yes.

I love this and I definitely get what you are saying. The the anger comment: I think people forget how important the journey TO forgiveness is (and if it is even necessary), and rather than embracing those emotions along the way, they are taught by these self-help books and pop psychology shows that the main goal is "forgiveness" and nothing-but. I think we live in a society where choosing to be ignorant or in denial is fully accepted and have become commonplace. I feel like the statements like "I'm grateful for my family" or "I'm grateful for what I have" start becoming excuses to hide even more behind our individualistic culture and sink deeper into the "every (wo)man for themselves" sentiment… if that makes sense. It amazes me sometimes how humans are so terrified of the ambiguity of emotions and how easy it is for some to just cast them aside. Thank you for this article and sorry for the rambling!

Lyndsay more than 1 year ago

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About Real World CSW

Dr. Danna Bodenheimer is the author of Real World Clinical Social Work: Find Your Voice and Find Your Way.She shares practice wisdom with new clinicians.

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