Clinical Intersections

Clinical Intersections blog addresses clinical social work and how it intersects with current world issues. Written by clinicians and staff from Walnut Psychotherapy Center, it is published by The New Social Worker magazine.

Clinical Intersections blog addresses clinical social work and how it intersects with current world issues. Written by clinicians and staff from Walnut Psychotherapy Center, it is published by The New Social Worker magazine.

Crying at Work

What About Us? The Mental Health of Social Workers

The more we talk about being in the same sea as our clients, the more we can demystify the stigma around mental illness that keeps all of us from building the robust teams we need to continue our work in this powerful field of social work.

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Social workers are afraid they're doing it all wrong in this pandemic. We are trained in nuance and subtlety. We weren’t trained to live in a masked world. Our cats and dogs are in the room. We need national advocacy and guidance. Read more

Clinical Intersections

We are all grieving during the COVID-19 pandemic. There is no technique or strategy that will make us feel more prepared right now. The only goal, really, is to get through it connected and open and in relationship. Read more

Clinical Intersections 2 Comments

Of course, there is no universal feeling that defines being a social worker. However, I do believe there are some unifying, unsaid themes. Read more

Clinical Intersections

In social work training, we discuss working with structural forces and power differences by naming them and the ways they are showing up in the room. But how does this intervention fit within the general theory of what is curative for our clients? Read more

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What should I say next? This question, arising after the paperwork of intakes and goal setting, can feel terrorizing to social work students and new clinicians. It gets at the heart of what we do and the desire to always say the right next thing. Read more

Clinical Intersections 1 Comments