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Danna Bodenheimer

Dr Danna Bodenheimer

     Dr. Danna Bodenheimer, LCSW, is the author of Real World Clinical Social Work: Find Your Voice and Find Your Way (The New Social Worker Press, 2016). She lives and works in Philadelphia, PA. After leaving New York City in 2004, she had no idea that love for another city was possible. But working and living as a social worker in Philadelphia has demonstrated, for her, the beauty of her city.

     Danna graduated from Smith College, earning her bachelor’s degree in Women’s Studies. After wholeheartedly planning on attending a Ph.D. program in psychology, going so far as to get her post-baccalaureate degree in psychology from Columbia University, Danna discovered the intricate beauty and possibility that social work offers. Turning down psychology programs to receive her MSW from Smith College, and returning to her educational roots in Northampton, Danna found her clinical self. After completing two internships in Philadelphia, one in a partial day treatment program and another at a school for psychoanalysis, Danna began her career at the Tuttleman Counseling Center at Temple University.

     Three years later, while in the middle of her doctoral studies at the University of Pennsylvania, where she received her DSW, Danna began a teaching career and her own private practice. Having taught at Rutgers, Temple, and the University of Pennsylvania, Danna has settled into teaching at Bryn Mawr’s Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research. She teaches clinical practice and classes on gender and sexuality. Danna is now the head of the Walnut Psychotherapy Center, a trauma-informed outpatient setting that she founded, specializing in the treatment of the LGBTQ population.

     Danna spends her time supervising, practicing psychotherapy, teaching, and consulting. She is the mother of two amazing young boys and lives in Philadelphia with her wife. She uses Philadelphia as a landscape to study issues of oppression, intersecting identities, and complex socioeconomic struggle.

     Danna received the 2011-2012 Award for Excellence in Teaching from the University of Pennsylvania. She was also selected as a fellow for the American Psychoanalytic Association for 2012-2013. She is a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) in Pennsylvania.

Dr Danna Bodenheimer

Dr Danna Bodenheimer

Jonathan Singer of the Social Work Podcast interviews Dr. Danna Bodenheimer on what it means to be a clinical social worker. A phenomenal conversation between two social workers. A must-listen! more

Real World Clinical

Praise for Dr. Danna Bodenheimer's book, Real World Clinical Social Work: Find Your Voice and Find Your Way. more

Real World Clinical

Author biography for Dr. Danna Bodenheimer, author of Real World Clinical Social Work: Find Your Voice and Find Your Way. more

Real World Clinical

Read about Dr. Danna Bodenheimer's book, Real World Clinical Social Work: Find Your Voice & Find Your Way, including the full Table of Contents. Bodenheimer serves as a mentor or a supportive supervisor as she shares practice wisdom. more

Social Work Books

It is essential to remind ourselves and our clients that we are not working to eliminate painful affect states. We are working to find the tools to survive the inevitability of these states. more

Real World Clinical

Dr. Danna Bodenheimer on micro/macro practice, the economy, trauma, social movements, and the future for social workers and their clients after the election. more

Real World Clinical 2 Comments

There is so much that we get wrong about grief, and it isn’t surprising. Like most things in life, we are desperately trying to keep an unwieldy process orderly and comprehensible. The fact about grief, though, is that it is neither. more

Real World Clinical 2 Comments

It is important to know that being triggered is about having first been traumatized. The word triggered signifies that a trauma has occurred and that specific stimuli can bring us back to this triggered state. more

Real World Clinical

Without taking too much of a stance on this either way, I want to share some thoughts on how deep work with personality disorders can feel. I also want to address the ways in which one can identify the presence of a personality disorder. more

Real World Clinical 1 Comments

One of the best parts of starting a private practice is that you can take it slowly. You can rent an office full time or for just a few hours a week. If you are ambivalent, I think it is worth finding out how it feels by giving it a shot. more

Real World Clinical 1 Comments

Let me be clear - not all social workers should quit their jobs. In fact, some of you are at perfectly stimulating and meaningful jobs. And some of you aren’t. more

Real World Clinical

Over time, I have found tremendous comfort in the NASW Code of Ethics. I have also come to some additional conclusions about how to practice ethically, born of work with a highly diverse caseload across multiple practice settings. more

Real World Clinical

Empaths feel with exquisite precision, are quite vulnerable to absorbing the energy of those around them, are easily hurt, are often considered “over-sensitive,” cannot easily compartmentalize psychological experiences, and are innately intuitive. more

Real World Clinical

Individuals with narcissistic tendencies, basically, function in a constant crisis around self-esteem. Rather than being driven by attachment, which many of us are, more narcissistic folks are driven by the wish to experience a stable sense of worth. more

Real World Clinical 1 Comments

The issue of achieving “good” self care at any time during one’s social work career is a near universal one. First, what “good” self care means varies from social worker to social worker. more

Real World Clinical

Don’t get me wrong, I love social work. I even loved social work school. I am offering these reflections and suggestions with the hope that they will be validating and helpful in making your education feel even more worthwhile. more

Real World Clinical 3 Comments

Whether you work with couples or you work with individuals, the fact is that you work with couples in some capacity. This is because most of our clients bring in their most intimate relationships, either literally or psychically. more

Real World Clinical 2 Comments

Preparing yourself and studying scapegoating dynamics is both empowering and a social work value. more

Real World Clinical 1 Comments

I met the therapist of my life in 1995. I was a sophomore in college. The vernacular around having a love of our life is well established. But we don’t talk as much about the therapist of our life. more

Real World Clinical

To successfully treat children who have been sexually abused, several paradigm shifts are required. This means, primarily, that we need to reconceptualize the possible scope of sexual abuse. more

Real World Clinical

Addiction work is truly trauma work. Trauma work requires deep attunement; recognition of developmental capacity and limitations; and steady, vigorous attention to the relationship. more

Real World Clinical 2 Comments

Clinically, our work comes down to the provision of an emotional acre of land for each client. For clients of color, this requires a more generous invitation into the room. It requires an intentional invitation honoring the complexity of our world. more

Real World Clinical 1 Comments

Whether it is referred to as a feeling of fraudulence, impostor syndrome, or a false sense of self, it is a psychological state that makes our work difficult, uncomfortable, and dissatisfying. more

Real World Clinical 3 Comments

One week after the mass shooting in Orlando, we are faced with the difficult work of managing the resulting trauma. Part of this management requires us to delineate between the presentation of trauma and other mental health struggles. more

Real World Clinical

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